Posts Tagged: everyone

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These selections from the “Property in Ideas” debate, taken from the pages of Benjamin Tucker’s Liberty (1890–1891), include provocative essays on property, anarchy, equal liberty and copyright from some of the leading individualist Anarchists of the 19th century. Includes articles by Benjamin Tucker, Victor Yarros, J. William Lloyd, Tak Kak, A. H. Simpson, John Beverley Robinson, and William Hanson.

“My understanding of my environment is my idea of it. … Everything that I understand I discover, just as much as the first man who understood it and discovered it… . I must discover it for myself. My understanding of another’s idea, as before shown, is not his idea, but my own, and my discovery of his discovery is original discovery so far as I am concerned, no matter how many thousand times discovered by others before. So, if original discovery gives exclusive right to copy, very well, all discovery is original; all understanding is original discovery for the individual making it, and beyond the individual we, as egoistic Anarchists, have no need to go… .

“Do I, then, deny copyright? Yes and no. I deny false, legal copyright, which is the privilege of the first man who exercises his faculties in discovery or production to forbid others to imitate without permission. This is really not copyright, but the invasion of true copyright, which is the inalienable right of every man to copy whatever he pleases if he can, a part of that complete natural liberty of the inoffensive for which we An­archists persistently stand. That there is no offence in copying is proved by the simple fact that, even if I think a thought similar to the thought of my fellow, he is not thereby at all prevented from thinking it; if he copies my hoe, he does not by so doing take away my hoe, or prevent my using it, or making as many as I please like it. This consideration alone is all­sufficient to make true Anarchists endorse free copyright, inasmuch as all action not invasive is truly free and justifiable.

“Legal copyright, patent-right, is only one form of that hydra headed monopoly which is reducing us all to slavery. This is the true copyright, my right and your right to copy and reproduce everything our senses comprehend; anything less than this stops human growth and blocks the wheels of progress. If I am free to copy all men’s thoughts and deeds, I am a man among men; if I may do freely only that which I am first to do, I am a pauper or a slave… .” — J. William Lloyd, “Copyright”

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"The pro-censorship feminists cannot have it both ways. If, as they contend, governmental power is inevitably used to the particular disadvantage of relatively disempowered groups, such as women, it follows that women’s rights advocates should oppose measures that augment that power, including Dworkin/MacKinnon-type laws."

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"Albert Jay Nock used to say that the state was created for the criminal purpose of creating a dependent class without access to property, for the benefit of the elites with access to land. The Brazilian state, in its uncompromising defense of big corporations’ “private property” combined to its ever dedicated effort to deprive poor of their property and control their access to land, is proof of that criminal intent. After all, from whom are the all the World Cup and Belo Monte property-less going to claim restitution?"

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"This idea means we are committed to a specific form of retaliation. We can act violent insofar as that violence is needed to defend ourselves or make ourselves whole. Taking my television back and breaking the thief’s arm is not needed to defend myself nor make myself whole - it’s not proportionate. Any action I take that goes beyond self-defense and restitution is, itself, aggression. In the case of the television, justice requires me taking back my television along with some compensation for what I had to go through (maybe I had to run after the thief and tore my shirt on a tree branch). Nothing more and nothing less."

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So You Think You're Smarter Than A CIA Agent

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"A superabundant world does exist, however, in ideal resources - ideas, patterns, concepts, words, expressions, information, knowledge, etc. (in other words, products of the mind). My use of a chicken soup recipe doesn’t interfere with or exclude anyone else’s ability also use it. The same goes for the design of an internal combustion engine, the arrangement and expression of words in a novel, the colors and patterns of a painting, the notes and rhythms of a musical composition, and anything that exists beyond the constraints of physical goods."

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This booklet brings together two recent essays on the corporate state and the production of state capitalism. If corporate liberals insist that we recognize how much government has built the business environment that surrounds us, then surely the next question to ask is – What is this corporate economy that the capitalist state has built?

“There is a deeper truth in Obama’s comments. Many businesses do not merely benefit from state intervention, but would sink without it. Big business’s dependence on government has only increased as government has grown. Yet liberals like Obama and Warren rarely confront the corporate interests that most rely on Washington’s redistribution of wealth to the powerful and socialization of risk. They love taking credit for subsidizing American businesses, but never address (or admit any responsibility for) the full reality of the corporate state. Perhaps they don’t want the inequality they decry traced back to them. . .” – Anthony Gregory

“Libertarians don’t do their cause any good at all when they try to defend big business on free enterprise grounds. There is no free enterprise at that level. No business is going to become big, in this economy, without approval from the gatekeepers. Free enterprise is a system which never existed, except for brief periods of time during historical social unrest. Once an elite is re­established, it’s back to the game. . . . It’s a crooked game and it’s the functional equivalent of Yaldabaoth’s ‘ersatz reality’ in certain neo­gnostic formulations. They replace our real life, our real myths, our real economic and social relations, with a pre­manufactured, pre­designed substitute that keeps us trapped in the spectacle of an honest world, but it’s all just flash and hot air.” – Anna O. Morgenstern

Anthony Gregory, a Research Editor at the Independent Institute and a blogger at The Huffington Post, is a libertarian activist, writer, and musician. He claims to be an anarcho­capitalist, but market anarchists get along with him anyway.

Anna O. Morgenstern, a Contributing Writer at the Center for a Stateless Society, has been an anarchist of one stripe or another for almost 30 years. Her intellectual interests include economic history, social psychology and voluntary organization theory.

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"Tax day is not a day of cooperation; it is a day of disappointment. It is a day that reminds us that the state cripples human potential. It is a reminder that the state is a constant hurdle to the resurgent market. It is a day that reminds us of the horrors and costs of central planning."

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UN Human Rights Committee Finds US in Violation on 25 Counts

While President Obama told the country to “look forward, not backward” when it came to Bush’s torture program, the United Nations has taken a different route. Recently, the UN Human Rights Committee issued a reportexcoriating the United States for its human rights violations. It focuses on violations of theInternational Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which the country is party. The report mentions 25 human rights issues where the United States is failing. This piece will focus on a few of those issues - Guantanamo, NSA surveillance, accountability for Bush-era human rights violations, drone strikes, racism in the prison system, racial profiling, police violence, and criminalization of the homeless. …

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"Today we work plenty, but very few of us are awarded the opportunity to truly labor. Work for economical means is a relatively new activity of human beings. The ancients had to work, chores had to be carried out for society to function - but for the vast majority of human history our societies were much more egalitarian. In our earlier history there was much more labor - individuals knew their interests and carried out their functions and roles within their communities. Work as we know it today has only been dominant across the whole of society since the advent of industrial capitalism. Work is no longer something that is shared cooperatively for the functioning of society - work now defines “our” economic system."