Posts Tagged: Libertarian

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"While we are seeing some strong divisions arise from the thickness debate, as we should, I don’t think we should expect to see — or should want to see — that same thing happen to the proverbial “libertarian aesthetic”, god forbid one take root. A particularly attractive and defining feature of the liberty movement is its regard for the individual, so what better libertarian aesthetic than the one that the individual happens to bring with them?"

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C4SS Feed 44 presents 's “The Libertarian and Catholic Social Teachings” read by James Tuttle and edited by Nick Ford.

Free markets don’t have to mean the particular incarnation of corporate world dominance we see all around us today. For an entire tradition, an individualist anarchism that once blossomed in the United States, free markets meant simply voluntary exchange between sovereign individuals with equal rights and liberties. If consistently adhered to, such a system would, these anarchists argued, distribute wealth and property more evenly and equitably, effectively ending the exploitation of the working poor.


Many of today’s free market libertarians continue in this tradition, arguing that libertarianism shouldn’t be either a defense of corporate capitalism or its euphemistic rhetorical substitute. For us, free markets are a system whereby individuals are left free to do whatever they might within the boundaries set by equal freedom — that is, all individuals stand on equal footing as free agents who might start their own businesses, homestead property or sell their work or wares.

Feed 44:

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Libertarians believe that there is, fundamentally, only one right: the right not to be aggressed against. All further rights are simply applications of, rather than supplements to, this basic right. Hence the vast panoply of other rights – positive rights, welfare rights – recognized by existing political regimes is dismissed as illegitimate.

This view seems mysterious to non-libertarians. More specifically, the libertarian position strikes many critics as puzzlingly one-sided. Freedom from aggression is a good thing, certainly; but so are freedom from hunger, freedom from disease, and freedom from poverty. Why not recognize rights in all these cases? What sort of lopsided view would one have to have of human life, in order to think that aggression is, but hunger, disease, and poverty are not, serious enough evils to take into account in devising a system of rights?

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Students For Liberty - A Letter to Libertarians from a Former Libertarian

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Liberty Minded

With a brand new website, the Liberty Minded crew is looking pretty good

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by Roderick T. Long

I want to talk about some of the main objections that have been given to libertarian anarchism and my attempts to answer them. But before I start giving objections and trying to answer them, there is no point in trying to answer objections to a view unless you have given some positive reason to hold the view in the first place. So, I just want to say briefly what I think the positive case is for it before going on to defend it against objections.

THE CASE FOR LIBERTARIAN ANARCHISM

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